December 17th, 2013

Vacuum Cleaner Relaxation & Other YouTube Natives

Been thinking about “native” YouTube genres, or genres which, in their way, are “native” to the platform, having necessarily emerged on YouTube — new forms and conventions, in other words, essentially made possible by YouTube’s existence and special features (especially, but not limited to, unprecedented access to an endless archive, thanks to massive uptake and network effects).

Lots of forms and practices that might seem novel to YouTube have been around as amateur / fan / folk / underground culture forever, which is why it may be instructive to ask not only about what is now more spectacular or obvious or invigorated (though those are all good queries), but what is also necessarily new (i.e., native). This would help us get a better idea of this juncture’s interplay between creative process, media ecology, and tech affordances/constraints.

I liked how several of my students’ YouTube montages from last fall — in seeking to plumb a song’s social life as depicted, richly if always incompletely, on YouTube — revealed certain YouTubey genres alongside and amidst the sundry contexts of meatspace (homes, buses, studios, stages) and their associated, overlapping genres (personal, public, pedagogical, performative and so on). Things like, say, Sponge Bob or Barack Obama belting cut-n-paste pop jams –

In addition to productions like these, native genres to YouTube would also have to include the likes of YouTube Poop, which, as the name suggests, is fairly obvious (if meta/dada) in its YouTubeness.

A lot of these examples are, tellingly, pastiches or other remixes — not surprising, given 1) wealth of access and 2) ease of editing — but native genres on YouTube are not limited to that mode. Something like the “Harlem Shake,” for instance, in centering on a shareable/viral syntax rather than a particular gesture or sign, suggests a class of YouTubey forms that are distinct from, say, the latest neighborhood dance step to jump from the corner to all corners (though those are also, as I’ve explored before, very much themselves YouTube abetted now).

***

In search of other native genres, I tried a little poll yesterday on Twitter, and I was treated to at least one class (or maybe more) of arguably native YouTube genres that have little if anything to do with remix or pastiche. One particularly interesting rabbithole, or more like a vacuumtube (if not quite a 9 hour suck), led me into a world of looooong non-musical sound clips on YouTube.

S/o Young Heraclitus / Dreamboat Slim for promptly pointing me to a video given the alluring billing of “Vacuum Cleaner Relaxation White Noise Sound Sleep Colic” and tagged with such canny search engine optimization as –

Mask Tinnitus, Sleep Aid, Enhance Privacy ,Block Distractions, Pacify children and pets, Soothe Migraines, Increase Focus
Lessen Stress vacuum cleaner sound
vacuum cleaner noise
sound of vacuum cleaner
noise of vacuum cleaner

Included in the description, you might be glad to hear, was a link to a page where one can download a 109mb 717 minute mp3. The page helpfully reads: “1 Man, 12 Hours of Vacuuming” and “You’ll get an MP3.”

Incidentally, I think the epic “performance” may simply be a 15 minute-or-so loop, but I haven’t studied it so closely; that said, I did have it on for a good hour yesterday. At low volume, I found it remarkably compelling.

Anyway, before you download, you might want to check it out on YouTube:

I should have suspected, I suppose, but it turns out there are LOTS of videos in this vein. The vid above leads, via YouTube’s recommendation engine, to any number of similar or indistinguishable efforts (especially at low volume). This 8 hour piece claims to be a “remix” but I have no idea what that means:

Truth be told, there’s a veritable plethora of epic ambient videos freely available on YouTube for your very own epic ambient experience, which, based on the descriptions and comments, mainly seems to be sleep. These include such evergreens as “Airbus 320 Cabin Sounds – 12 Hours – Take Off and Complementary treats served” or “The Sound of a Air Conditioner.” But for my money (i.e., earballs), you just can’t beat “Sucks 9 Hours” (tagged: Hood Fan Sound, Range Hood, Ventilation Fan, Cooker Hood, Extractor Hood, ASMR), though “The Sounds of a Box Fan 8hrs” (also available in mp3) is a close second –

This particular form’s nativity is, of course, directly related to one relatively big affordance: the unprecedented access to time that YouTube now provides. People, especially the non-Warhol sort, just didn’t typically make 7-12 hour films very frequently prior to the advent of unlimited time on YouTube. So one emerging “native” dimension of vernacular video we might lay at YouTube’s feet is the sudden desire to exploit the “platform” as something other than a visual medium — but not just as a jukebox, rather as a long duration white noise machine (or pink, if you prefer).

But another arguably “native” dimension here — at least in terms of popular practice — is this particular use of sound, via YouTube, to produce physical/psychological/psychosomatic effects. Many of the videos like those above, you may notice, are also tagged with ASMR — i.e., “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response” — which Joshua Hudelson describes in a post on Sounding Out! as “a pseudo-medical designation whose native soil is YouTube.” (h/t @pm_jawn)

For Hudelson, ASMR videos “traverse the gap between the sonic and the haptic.” Notably, for all its “nativity,” this blurring across sensory registers as well as cultural domains / listening contexts, and this particular use of YouTube as source of pleasure and therapy, makes for an uneasy and sometimes rather dissonant experience. According to Hudelson,

The slow-paced, low-volume respite that Whisper videos offer is made all the more necessary by the fact that viewers must go online to watch them. This paradox is amplified by YouTube’s advertisements, which will sound especially abrasive because viewers tend to turn the volume up while listening to Whisper videos.

While this discordance may be more acute in the “Whisper video” genre Hudelson examines, than, say, low-volume and interminable ambient noise clips, it does suggest that native genres on YouTube are not exactly “at home” there even if that’s where they reside. In other words, just because something is native to an ecosystem doesn’t mean it will enjoy ideal symbiosis.

Which is certainly one insight to emerge from this vacuumhole.

But what else am I overlooking/hearing/touching? Let me know. I’m all earballs.

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. wayneandwax  |  December 18th, 2013 at 10:47 am

    Tip of the hat to Nhoj Elttil for reminding me of the wonderful and hilarious — and I think inarguably native to YouTube — “shred” genre. Again, this is firmly in the remix culture camp, and with a parodic edge to boot, but still, worth noting. Here’s an Eddie Van Halen vid Nhoj points to:

    which reminded me of an old favorite featuring Eric Clapton –

  • 2. wayneandwax  |  December 18th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

    Nohj adds that, for all its YouTube nativity, the “shreds” genre seems largely to be the work of one guy, StSanders, so perhaps it’s not quite as much a community-driven effort. He also points to an uproarious “classical turn” for the spoofs:

  • 3. caleb t-r  |  December 30th, 2013 at 5:01 pm

    Whats the difference between a youtube native genre and a meme?

    At our house, we like to watch:

    Video reviews of toys (esp. play-doh) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yhRBh05q-w

    Kids’ remakes of kid-marketed media using their personal merchandise (definitely fits with remix culture) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgC8dHXs0ic

  • 4. wayneandwax  |  January 2nd, 2014 at 3:19 pm

    Hey, Caleb — I guess I’d say that one could think of any of these YouTubey genres (or any genre for that matter) as a meme if one likes, at least according to Dawkins’s formulation. The more specific, recent definition of meme — as a replicable gesture propagated via internet — is even more applicable, I guess. But because of both the generality and more specific uses of “meme,” I’ve decided not to use it in this case, preferring “genre” and “form” (which are also vague, I admit) to describe these “platform”-”native” phenomena.

    Those toy-demo videos are bizarre! And the kid remakes are awesome. (Might have to try some of that with the girls!) Makes me think that the world of “native” YouTubes has got to be much larger than I was thinking. With quotidian video so available and easy to broadcast, it’s not surprising that people would film and share just about anything — and that certain genres or forms would succeed as memes.

    Re: to meme or not to meme, I still really appreciate Henry Jenkins’s discussion here:
    http://henryjenkins.org/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p.html

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Wayne&Wax

I'm a techno-musicologist, internet annotator, imagined community organizer.

I left my <3 in the digital global, but I reside in Cambridge, MA, where I'm from.

I represent like that.

wayne at wayneandwax dot com

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